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We’ve not done our nine-times-tables yet

January 24, 2014

Rather pleasantly, we got sent a free copy of a game called Plyt for us to check out. Miss B was excited about the prospect as it is a game about maths, something she enjoys at school, and the last maths based game we tried out (City of Zombies) went down very well.

It's a bit unfair to use flash photography when someone is actually thinking, so here is Miss B pretending to think.  You will also note that she has almost won and I have almost started.

It’s a bit unfair to use flash photography when someone is actually thinking, so here is Miss B pretending to think. You may also note that she has almost won and I have almost started.

Unlike City of Zombies, Plyt is a traditional competitive game, where everyone is trying to be the first to move their pawn around a spiral track to the winner’s space in the middle. On your turn you roll a bunch of twelve-sided dice and have the time provided by a 30-second sand timer to multiply the numbers on the dice. If you do it correctly in the time (you’ll probably need a calculator for checking — luckily Miss B has one in the shape of a frog which she relished using), you move forward a number of spaces equal to the number on the differently coloured die. If this moves you onto a space with a Plyt logo on it, you draw a “chance” card, which may be to the advantage or disadvantage of yourself or an opponent.

That’s about it.

To be frank, I was a little disappointed when I opened the box and seeing it was nothing cleverer than rolling dice and doing sums, with no chrome other than the unimaginatively named “chance” cards. Even the rules to set up balance between players are presented as optional rules that you should negotiate before you start. This is clearly not a game created by someone embedded in the modern gaming hobby.

BUT…

But it works. Make some reasonably intelligent choices with the balancing rules and go for it, and we at least had a good time with the game. Miss B was rolling two dice each time, which meant she got most of the calculations right but had trouble with some of the times-tableses, while I was rolling four dice and revealing that my mental arithmetic skills could seriously do with improving. I got beaten quite spectacularly.

And then the game got a real thumbs up from Miss B: she wanted to play again, suggesting that I might like to use fewer dice to make it easier for myself (stubbornly, I refused). She beat me a second time (though it was much closer) and asked for a third game. It was, however, time for dinner, so we had to stop there.

Incidentally, I’d like to give kudos for the excellent decision to provide a little dish for rolling dice into. This makes things so much easier and almost avoids having dice landing on the floor or knocking pieces off the floor.

So, while I am not overwhelmed by Plyt as a game, it has some things to recommend it, and Miss B is extremely keen. So it’s certainly going to get played again.

The verdict from Miss B (aged 7): “It was a very good game. I really liked the chance cards idea because they move you up or down a level and other stuff you weren’t expecting so you don’t know what’s going to happen to you and your opponents. I like the game overall. I think it was a good idea to make it about maths because I’m really good at it.”

The game: Plyt (Talkplaces), 2 to 6 players aged 4+.

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